Is there any situation where physical therapy could do more harm than good for someone?

Many patients who consider physical therapy wonder, “Does it hurt?”

The quick and simple answer is “No”. During physical treatment, there should not be any pain.

You may be nervous or apprehensive if you have never tried physical therapy. An unfamiliar stranger is about to probe the area of your body that causes you pain and suffering.

It doesn’t matter what you think. Let’s dispel any myths about physical therapy you might have heard. Then, come to your first appointment with a positive outlook.  My physical therapy will cause my discomfort or pain to worsen.

“No.” “No” is the simple answer.

Physical therapy patients often fear that their discomfort will worsen as a result of their treatment.  But, as long you and your physical therapist agree, there should never be any painful or incontinental treatment.

It is important to communicate clearly with your patient because every patient has different characteristics and a different pain threshold. Your therapist will be attentive to your concerns and try to ease your pain.

Is that to say that you won’t feel any pain?

No.

Take it this way…

After exercising in a way your body isn’t used to such as gardening or exercise, soreness can occur in the muscles.  This is what we mean when we say something is “good pain”.

It’s possible that discomfort is a good thing, as it helps in healing.

Your body will heal itself if you are willing to put in the effort and time. The discomfort will eventually disappear.  Physical therapy can only be effective if you are actively involved. Even if it’s difficult, you will see the results if your efforts are put into the process.

Is physical therapy painful?

A certified physical therapist should perform any physical treatment.

This can be difficult.

You will feel pain and suffering during and after every training session.

Do not be discouraged.

If you want to build strength, your body must be trained. You should not be uncomfortable with stretching and other activities.  If therapy becomes too difficult or painful, you can modify it.

Communication of your exact goals and reactions to therapy will improve your rehabilitation.

Last words

Physical Therapy: Pain Management

Tell your therapist all about your comfort levels so that they can help you distinguish between pain and soreness.  Your therapist will likely ask you how you felt after the last session, what improvements you believe you made, and what problems you are having in therapy.   Your therapist will need to see you as open and honest to adjust your treatment plan to reduce any discomfort or pain.